Sviluppo del cibo Cinese in Italia

Elisabetta Bizzarri

elisabetta bizzarri2

Chinese food in western countries: an Italian anthropological perspective.

Il cibo cinese nei paesi occidentali: una prospettiva antropologica in Italia.

 

 

English

 

Chinese food in western countries: an Italian anthropological perspective.

Chinese-food lovers appreciate the variety of Chinese cuisine expressed in an array of regional variants and multiplicity of ingredients. However, often Chinese food outside of China differs remarkably from the original recipes, having a limited gamut of ingredients and offering only a few variants for each dish. This happened because Chinese gastronomy adapted quickly to foreign habits and tastes and to the scarcity of Asian food supplies in the West. This adaptation was possible given the great flexibility of Chinese traditions, the skills of migrant Chinese cooks and the strong influence of the local food culture on the Chinese. A few studies investigated the causes driving ethnic cuisine to modify accordingly to the country where it spread. As a voluntary researcher of Ming-Ai (London) Institute and thanks to Federica Pani who researched this phenomenon, here I try to describe the Chinese food culture in Italy.

I have always enjoyed ethnic food as a way to contact remote cultures through their dishes. Chinese food has always been a favourite, especially because of its distinctive flavours and crockery, notably chopsticks and bowls. Travelling abroad and tasting ethnic cuisines in various European countries, I discovered that they differed remarkably from their Italian version. Travellers tasting the international Chinese cuisine recognise the difference between Italian-Chinese food and the French, British or American-Chinese that are considered of a better quality. Chinese food in the UK has many vegetarian dishes, in the USA is served mainly in Chinese fast-food chains, while in Germany is yet very similar to the local cuisine. What caused Chinese food to change in each country as it spread? Which variants would be more similar to the original recipes?

Ethnic food changes abroad, mainly due to the scarce supply of traditional ingredients, the preparation costs, the hosting countries’ food cultures and habits, and the migrant cooks’ expertise.

Chinese cuisine is characterised by a great flexibility in the choice of ingredients since the preparation and cooking techniques and the combination of flavours are sufficient to give a specific Chinese twist to any dish. Accordingly, a Chinese proverb recites: “A good cook knows how to round the angles”, meaning a skilful chef would know how to adapt in case of necessity. So Chinese cuisine adapted to the lack of Asian ingredients in the West. In Italy, given the little Chinese population in the 1950s and 60s, the first Chinese restaurants had to import typical products from London or Paris retailers. The first Chinese migrated to Italy soon after the First World War from the United Kingdom, France and the Netherlands, countries that had colonised several Asian territories. During the Second World War, the 50s and 60s, other waves of migration from China spread to Italy. Now the migrants arrived mainly from Hong Kong and Taiwan, whereas the first migrants were from mainland China, in particular from the Zhejiang, Fujian and Jiangxi regions.

The first Chinese restaurant in Italy, the “Shanghai”, opened in Rome in 1949. Initially, due to the strong gastronomic traditions and several regional cuisines occurring in this Mediterranean country, the diffusion of Chinese food in Italy had been slow. The expansion of Chinese cuisine to other cities took a long time. In fact, initially, Chinese restaurants were located solely in Chinatowns where the Chinese migrants and Asian travellers gathered. A broad diffusion of Chinese food in Italy happened when professional Chinese cooks from Hong Kong arrived. In fact, Hong Kong cooks were able to understand and satisfy Western customers’ tastes. This ability was developed in Hong Kong where they experienced a multinational environment during the British colonial period. In Hong Kong, chefs from many mainland regions cooked traditional Chinese cuisine for foreigners, traders, politicians, and businessmen.

Cooks from Hong Kong were employed in the first restaurants in Milan and Florence offering high-quality service and food for medium to high prices. These restaurants had high standards because following the Chinese tradition they employed several head chefs whom each dealt with a different phase of food preparation ranging from cutting to cooking to preparation of dim sum. A small crowd of curious youngsters with a passion for exotic foods and well-off, middle-aged Italians started then to appreciate the Chinese food culture.

During the 1980s, a radical change happened when Chinese food favoured by a growing “eating-out” trend started to become a phenomenon in Italy. Italians’ eating habits were modified by an increasing welfare, a shortened lunch-break and a fashion for exotic destinations. This increased the demand for low-cost fast foods and ethnic restaurants. Chinese restaurants were able to take advantage of this new trend by decreasing their prices. Low prices were achieved by employing unspecialised and low-profile staff. The Hong Kong chefs were substituted by their assistants who had learned through observation and had never received a formal training. Chinese restaurants became a family business where up to five to ten relatives or friends were working together. Low prices were easily maintained because Chinese cuisine can be based on relatively cheap cereals and vegetables, using only little quantities of the expensive meat and fish. Moreover, the cooking process is quick and thus helping to reduce the costs. In addition, globalisation made food and cookware supplies from China become common and cheap in Italy.

Therefore, the Italian Chinese community stopped to rely on the British and French Chinese communities, established from a longer time, for the provision of food supplies and expertise.

The menu changed since dishes that encountered the favour of the wider public started to be proposed in more and more variants. Chinese restaurants adapted rapidly to the local taste in order to minimise the disorientation experienced by the first customers. New categories of food were introduced following the customers reactions of appreciation or dislike.

The menus adapted to Italian tradition in two ways.

First, the menus were written according to the order in which the dishes are brought to the table in Italy. In fact, Italians consider each dish as belonging to a specific category: starters, first courses, second courses, side dishes, and desserts. On the contrary, according to Chinese tradition all the different dishes arrive on the table at the same time regardless of their ingredients, flavour and taste. Hence, Chinese dishes were categorised arbitrarily to fit in one of the courses, for instance all the sweet-taste recipes became desserts. Dim sum, spring rolls and wonton were included in the starters. They had only a few variants, generally ranging between meat stuffing (fried or steamed) or steamed shrimps and vegetables.

Second, the tastes of some recipes have been rendered milder to suit Western customers. Garlic, spices, onions and seasonings were reduced whereas batters and gravies became more abundant for the influence of Western gastronomies. The healthy Chinese dishes cooked with minimum quantities of oils were enriched by thick sauces containing maize starch and sodium glutamate. The unprepared and little trained new cooks added sugar and vegetable oils to almost all the recipes served by Chinese fast foods. Traditional dishes started to be prepared using preserved and canned food, cheap and easy to supply from China, thus their taste changed. Fresh ingredients required in traditional dishes were eliminated or substituted by frozen products. This had negative implications on the Chinese food produced in Italy because its nutritional and dietary principles were reduced by the use of relatively low-quality ingredients. Time constraint and practicality required to discontinue the dishes which needed slow and complex cooking procedures. For instance, the famous Peking Roast Duck is found very rarely in Italian Chinese restaurants. On the contrary, very common are the fried or “sauté” dishes fast and cheap to cook. The great variety of Chinese cuisine was drastically reduced to a few successful recipes. The diffident Italian clients discouraged the  introduction of foods such as shark, jellyfish, snails, crickets and certain algae in the menu. The fantasy of Chinese food culture was considered too extravagant by Western standards. In Italy, Chinese restaurants serve mostly chicken and beef that are the favourite meat; pork, lamb and duck are less frequent; soups, tofu and pidan (preserved eggs) are rare. Seafood (with the exception of shrimps), fish, plain rice and soy noodles are rarely ordered and thus have limited presence in the menu. In fact, Italians often don’t consider steamed rice as the main component of the meal and would rather order more elaborated and tasty dishes in a Chinese restaurant. Often, restaurants offer a double menu: one for Asian customers, and the other for the Westerners.

Italians contributed with their preferences to shape the Chinese menus.

Italians’ favourite flavour is the “sweet and sour” invented as a sauce used in Chinese restaurants to substitute the Western ketchup. Moreover, Italians often finish their meals with a sweet dessert, often fried, such as fried ice-cream or fruit.

The Italian customers appreciate the exotic and the aesthetics of Chinese dishes and the kindness of the staff in Chinese restaurants.

The change in taste and lowering in price were opposed by Italian and traditional Chinese restaurants which battled against the unfair competition of low-quality Chinese food, and advocated for a more authentic Chinese gastronomy. However, ultimately the customers’ preferences had influenced Chinese food in Western countries for a long time, and only recently a more aware and experienced public is starting to request a more authentic Chinese gastronomy. Nevertheless, hopefully in the future more and more people would have the possibility to taste Chinese food in its home country, and hence discover this stunning ancient culture through its varied yet distinctive flavours.

 

References:
 
Anderson, E. N. Jr., "Chinese cuisine", The Cambridge Encyclopedia of China, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Chang, Guangji, Food in Chinese Culture - Anthropological and Hístorícal Perspectíves, New Haven, Yale University Press, 1977.

Giambelli, Rodolfo A., "L’emigrazione cinese in Italia: il caso di Milano", Mondo Cinese, n. 48, 1984, pp. 27-44.

Koo, Linda, "Dieta tradizionale cinese e sua relazione con la salute", Mondo Cinese, n. 12, 1975, pp. 11-42.

La Pira, Roberto, "Dalla Cina con (poco) amore - La ristorazione praticata più per necessità che per vocazione", B.A.R. GIORNALE, ottobre 1986.

Redi Federica, 1997
Bacchette e forchette: la diffusione della cucina cinese in Italia
Mondo Cinese, 95 - online paper. http://www.tuttocina.it/mondo_cinese/095/095_redi.htm

Robinson, Vaughan, "Une minorité invisible: les Chinois au Royaume-Uni", Revue Europeenne des Migratíons Internationales, vol. 8 - n. 3, 1992.

Testa, Cinzia - Tizzoni, Monica, La Cina in cucina, Milano, Mondadori, 1993.

The Food of China, New Haven, Yale University Press, 1988.

 

Italiano

 

Il cibo cinese nei paesi occidentali: una prospettiva antropologica in Italia.

Gli amanti del cibo cinese apprezzano la varietà della cucina cinese espressa in una gamma di varianti regionali e molteplicità di ingredienti. Ciò nonostante, spesso la cucina cinese al di fuori della Cina offre poche varianti per ogni piatto differendo nettamente dalle ricette originali che si gustano in Cina. Questo è dovuto al veloce adattamento della gastronomia cinese ai costumi e gusti stranieri e alla scarsità di ingredienti asiatici in Occidente. Questo adattamento è stato possibile data la grande flessibilità della cucina tradizionale cinese, la varietà delle cucine regionali cinesi, la abilità dei cuochi cinesi che sono emigrati e la forte influenza delle culture gastronomiche locali sulla gastronomia cinese. Alcuni studi hanno analizzato le cause che hanno indotto la modificazione della cucina etnica nelle nazioni in cui essa si è espansa. In questo articolo, come ricercatore volontario del Ming-Ai (London) Institute e grazie a Federica Pani che ha condotto una dettagliata ricerca su questo fenomeno, io cerco di descrivere la cultura del cibo cinese in Italia.

Ho sempre apprezzato i cibi etnici come un mezzo per interagire con culture lontane attraverso i loro piatti. Il cibo cinese è sempre stato uno dei favoriti, specialmente per i suoi sapori caratteristici e le sue stoviglie peculiari notoriamente bacchette e scodelle. Viaggiando in paesi stranieri e gustando la cucina etnica in varie nazioni Europee, ho scoperto che la cucina cinese all’estero differiva notevolmente dalla cucina cinese in Italia. I viaggiatori che hanno gustato la cucina cinese internazionalmente riconoscono la differenza tra il cibo cinese-italiano, quello francese, il britannico o quello americano, questi ultimi considerati di migliore qualità. Il cibo cinese nel Regno Unito propone molti piatti vegetariani, negli Stati Uniti la cucina cinese si serve principalmente in catene di ristoranti fast food, mentre in Germania i ristoranti cinesi servono piatti fortemente influenzati dalla cucina locale. Cosa ha causato il cambiamento del cibo cinese nelle varie nazioni in cui si è diffuso? Quali varianti sono più simili alle ricette cinesi originali?

Il cibo etnico cambia all’estero principalmente a causa della scarsità di ingredienti tradizionali, del costo delle preparazioni, della influenza della cultura e delle abitudini alimentari locali e della esperienza dei cuochi emigrati. La cucina cinese è caratterizzata da una grande flessibilità nella scelta degli ingredienti poiché la preparazione, le tecniche di cottura e la combinazione degli ingredienti sono sufficienti a dare una specifica nota cinese a qualsiasi piatto. Non a caso un proverbio cinese recita: “Un buon cuoco sa come arrotondare gli angoli”, significando che un cuoco esperto sa come adattare la sua cucina in caso di necessità. In questo modo la cucina cinese si è adattata alla scarsità di ingredienti asiatici in Occidente. In Italia, data la ridotta popolazione cinese prima degli anni ‘50 e ’60, i primi ristoranti cinesi dovevano importare prodotti tipici dai negozianti di Londra e Parigi. I primi migranti cinesi in Italia arrivarono poco dopo la prima guerra mondiale dal Regno Unito, la Francia e l’Olanda, nazioni che avevano colonizzato alcuni territori in Asia. Durante la seconda guerra mondiale e durante gli anni ’50 e ’60 altre ondate migratorie dalla Cina raggiunsero l’Italia. Ora gli emigranti arrivavano principalmente da Hong Kong e Taiwan, mentre i primi emigranti provenivano dalla Cina continentale e in particolare dalle regioni dello Zhejiang, Fujian e Jiangxi.

Il primo ristorante Cinese in Italia, lo “Shanghai”, aprì a Roma nel 1949. Inizialmente, a causa delle forti tradizioni gastronomiche e numerose cucine regionali presenti in questa nazione mediterranea, la diffusione del cibo cinese in Italia fu lenta. Ci volle molto tempo affinché la cucina cinese si diffondesse in altre città. Infatti, all’inizio, i ristornati cinesi si trovavano solamente nelle Chinatown dove si raggruppavano gli emigrati cinesi e i viaggiatori asiatici. Quando da Hong Kong arrivarono dei cuochi cinesi professionisti iniziò una veloce e ampia espansione del cibo cinese in Italia. In effetti i cuochi di Hong Kong furono capaci di capire e soddisfare i gusti dei clienti occidentali.

Questa capacità era stata acquisita a Hong Kong dove questi cuochi avevano lavorato in un ambiente multinazionale durante il periodo della colonia britannica. Infatti i cuochi di Hong Kong provenendo dalle varie regioni continentali erano abituati a cucinare cucine tradizionali cinesi per stranieri, commercianti, politici e uomini d’affari.

Cuochi di Hong Kong furono impiegati nei primi ristoranti di Milano e Firenze che offrivano servizi e cibi di alta qualità a prezzi medi o alti.
Questi ristoranti avevano standard molto alti perché seguendo la tradizione cinese impiegavano numerosi capo-cuochi ognuno dei quali esperto in una differente fase della preparazione del cibo dai tagli, alle cotture, alla preparazione dei dim sum.

Gradualmente una piccola folla di giovani curiosi appassionati di cucina esotica e un ristretto gruppo di Italiani benestanti di mezza età iniziò a apprezzare la cultura culinaria cinese.

Negli anni 80, quando il cibo cinese fu favorito dalla crescente moda di “mangiare fuori”, il cibo cinese divenne un fenomeno sociale e avvenne un cambio radicale nella sua domanda e offerta. Le abitudini degli Italiani cambiarono a causa di un aumento del benessere, una pausa pranzo più breve e la moda di viaggiare in località esotiche. Questo aumentò la domanda per fast food economici e ristoranti etnici. I ristoratori cinesi sono stati in grado di beneficiare di questo nuovo trend diminuendo i prezzi dei loro piatti e offrendo una cucina rapida e a basso costo. I modici prezzi erano ottenuti impiegando cuochi e assistenti non qualificati e di basso profilo. I cuochi di Hong Kong furono sostituiti dai loro aiutanti che avevano appreso attraverso l’osservazione dei cuochi professionisti ma non avevano mai ricevuto una formazione professionale. I ristoranti cinesi divennero una attività di famiglia in cui da 5 a 10 parenti o amici lavoravano insieme. I bassi prezzi erano inoltre facili da ottenere perché la cucina cinese si basa su ingredienti relativamente economici come cereali e verdure usando solo piccole quantità di cibi più costosi come carne e pesce. Inoltre il tempo di cottura delle ricette utilizzate divenne veloce aiutando a ridurre i costi per il combustibile e l’attesa dei clienti. Alla globalizzazione il merito di facilitare l’arrivo e rendere abbondanti ed economici  gli ingredienti ed utensili provenienti dalla Cina.

In questo modo la comunità italo cinese non dovette più affidarsi alle più grandi e più anziane comunità britanniche e francesi per l’approvvigionamento di ingredienti, stoviglie e personale qualificato. 

Il menu cambiò poiché i piatti che incontrarono il favore di un più vasto pubblico iniziarono ad essere proposti in più e più varianti. I ristoranti cinesi si adattarono rapidamente ai gusti locali per minimizzare il disorientamento vissuto dai primi clienti. Nuovi tipi di piatti furono introdotte assecondando le reazioni di disappunto o di apprezzamento della nuova clientela.

Il menu si adattò alle tradizioni italiane in due modi.

In primo luogo i menu furono scritti assecondando l’ordine in cui i piatti sono portati in tavola in Italia. Infatti, gli Italiani considerano ogni piatto appartenente a una categoria specifica come antipasti, primi piatti, secondi, contorni e dolci. Al contrario, secondo la tradizione cinese tutti i vari piatti sono portati in tavola contemporaneamente indipendentemente dagli ingredienti utilizzati, il sapore o il gusto della ricetta. Di conseguenza le ricette cinesi furono raggruppate arbitrariamente per far parte di una delle categorie del menu, ad esempio tutti i piatti di sapore dolce furono classificati come dessert. Dim sum, involtini primavera e won-ton furono raggruppati tra gli antipasti. Queste ricette erano rappresentate solo da qualche variante, generalmente con ripieni di carne (fritte o al vapore) o con ripieni di gamberetti e verdure al vapore.

In secondo luogo, il sapore di alcune ricette è stato reso più neutro per adattarsi alla clientela occidentale. Aglio, spezie, cipolle e condimenti sono stati ridotti, mentre impanature e salse sono diventate più abbondanti per la influenza delle gastronomie occidentali. I dietetici piatti cinesi cucinati con quantità minime di oli iniziarono ad essere arricchiti da salse dense contenenti amido di mais e glutammato monosodico. I nuovi cuochi poco preparati e non qualificati iniziarono ad aggiungere zucchero e oli vegetali a pressoché tutte le ricette servite nei fast food cinesi.

I piatti tradizionali cinesi iniziarono ad essere preparati usando cibi in scatola e a lunga conservazione più economici e facilmente reperibili dalla Cina. Di conseguenza il gusto di queste ricette cambiò. I piatti tradizionali che richiedevano ingredienti freschi furono eliminati o sostituti da prodotti congelati. Questo ebbe implicazioni negative per il cibo cinese prodotto in Italia perché i suoi principi nutrizionali e dietetici furono ridotti dall’uso di ingredienti di qualità piuttosto bassa.

A causa del tempo limitato e per motivi di praticità, le ricette che necessitavano di procedure di cottura lente e complesse furono eliminate dal menu. Ad esempio, la famosa anatra laccata alla pechinese si trova raramente nei ristoranti cinesi italiani. Al contrario, sono molto comuni i piatti fritti o saltati in padella i quali sono veloci e economici da cuocere.

La immensa varietà della cucina cinese si ridusse drasticamente a qualche ricetta di successo. I diffidenti clienti italiani scoraggiarono la introduzione di cibi come squali, meduse, lumache, grilli e certi tipi di alghe nel menu.

La fantasia della cultura culinaria cinese fu considerata essere troppo estravagante per le abitudini occidentali. Infatti in Italia i ristoranti cinesi servono prevalentemente pollo e manzo che sono le carni preferite. Maiale, agnello e anatra sono meno frequenti nei menu, mentre le zuppe, il tofu e le uova dei cento giorni sono serviti di rado.

I frutti di mare, con la eccezione dei gamberetti), il pesce, il riso bollito e gli spaghetti di soia sono ordinati di rado e per questo hanno una presenza limitata nei menu dei ristoranti cinesi. Infatti gli Italiani spesso non considerano il riso bollito come la componente principale del loro pasto e preferiscono ordinare dei piatti più elaborati e succulenti quando mangiano al ristorante cinese. Di conseguenza spesso questi ristoranti offrono un menu doppio, uno per i clienti asiatici e uno per gli occidentali. Per questo gli Italiani hanno contribuito con le loro abitudini a modificare i menu dei ristoranti cinesi. Il sapore preferito dagli Italiani è l’agrodolce che è stato creato come una salsa usata nei ristoranti cinesi come sostituto del ketchup utilizzato in occidente. Inoltre gli Italiani che mangiano nei ristoranti cinesi in Italia spesso finiscono i loro pasti con un dolce, spesso fritto, come il gelato o la frutta fritta. Gli Italiani apprezzano la estetica esotica dei piatti cinesi e la cortesia del personale dei ristoranti cinesi.

Quando la rivoluzione nella cucina italo cinese avvenne, i ristoratori italiani e cinesi che offrivano cibi tradizionali di buona qualità, lamentando la competizione sleale di un cibo di bassa qualità e promuovendo una gastronomia cinese più autentica, si opposero al cambio nel gusto e la riduzione nei prezzi. Tuttavia, in ultima istanza, le preferenze dei clienti influenzarono lo sviluppo del cibo cinese in occidente per molto tempo e solo recentemente un pubblico più esperto e navigato sta iniziando a optare per  una cucina cinese più autentica. Rimane la speranza che in futuro più e più persone abbiano la possibilità di gustare il cibo cinese in Cina e così scoprire questa antica e meravigliosa cultura attraverso i suoi vari e caratteristici sapori.

 

Bibliografia:
 
Anderson, E. N. Jr., "Chinese cuisine", The Cambridge Encyclopedia of China, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Chang, Guangji, Food in Chinese Culture - Anthropological and Hístorícal Perspectíves, New Haven, Yale University Press, 1977.

Giambelli, Rodolfo A., "L’emigrazione cinese in Italia: il caso di Milano", Mondo Cinese, n. 48, 1984, pp. 27-44.

Koo, Linda, "Dieta tradizionale cinese e sua relazione con la salute", Mondo Cinese, n. 12, 1975, pp. 11-42.

La Pira, Roberto, "Dalla Cina con (poco) amore - La ristorazione praticata più per necessità che per vocazione", B.A.R. GIORNALE, ottobre 1986.

Redi Federica, 1997
Bacchette e forchette: la diffusione della cucina cinese in Italia
Mondo Cinese, 95 - online paper. http://www.tuttocina.it/mondo_cinese/095/095_redi.htm

Robinson, Vaughan, "Une minorité invisible: les Chinois au Royaume-Uni", Revue Europeenne des Migratíons Internationales, vol. 8 - n. 3, 1992.

Testa, Cinzia - Tizzoni, Monica, La Cina in cucina, Milano, Mondadori, 1993.

The Food of China, New Haven, Yale University Press, 1988.


Author

 

Miss Elisabetta Bizzarri, BVet, MSc, MSc

Elisabetta has lived, worked and studied in Italy until she graduated in Veterinary Medicine in 2006.

Ever since she moved to London in 2007, she worked in various sectors ranging from nanotechnology to fitness. In 2010 she obtained an MSc in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences awarded by Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL), and in 2011 she was awarded with an MSc in Anthropology, Environment and Development by University College London (UCL). She travelled to the East for research on two occasions and spent around a month in China in 2011.

Her interests span across many subjects and she loves learning languages and travelling to experience other cultures.

 

 

Dott.ssa Elisabetta Bizzarri, Medico Veterinario, Master of  Science, Master of  Science

Elisabetta ha vissuto, lavorato e studiato in Italia fino alla laurea in Medicina Veterinaria nel  2006.

Da quando si è trasferita a Londra nel 2007 ha lavorato in vari ambiti dalla nanotecnologia al fitness. Nel 2010 ha ottenuto dalla Queen Mary University (QMUL) un Master in Freshwater and Coastal Sciences e nel 2011 uno intitolato Anthropology, Environment and Development dal University College London. Ha viaggiato in Asia per ricerca in due occasioni e speso circa un mese in Cina nel 2011.

I suoi interessi abbracciano numerose materie, adora imparare le lingue e viaggiare per conoscere altre culture.